Media Psychology Avatar

Notes

Selfie Use or Abuse? Take the Quiz.

My last post on “selfies” generated some interesting and spirited comments. Some were pro-selfies and some were against, but none neutral. The fact remains that selfies are a trend. Here are some tips about how to evaluate selfie use and keep it from becoming a problem.

Notes

Teachers learn to integrate technology into curriculum - Washington Post

See on Scoop.it - Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies

With iPads in hand, the math and science teachers walked around Charles Carroll Middle School recently snapping pictures of images that illustrated the school’s motto — Pride. When they returned to the the media center, they used an iPad application that creates videos, then they chose a style and music and uploaded the video to a Web site. The exercise in Prince George’s County was part of a professional development lesson funded by the Verizon Foundation to promote the use of technology in the classroom, especially in schools in underserved communities


See on news.google.com

Notes

Alt-Minds and the promise of ‘transmedia’


Keith Stuart: The term ‘transmedia’ has been derided in the past, but a Parisian developer reckons it may be the future of gaming, and Alt-Minds is the first instalment…

See on guardian.co.uk

Notes

For the blind Augmented Reality finger puppet that tells you what is in front of you! Tech Review


The EyeRing takes this a step further by offering aural feedback via a wearable device. And while it’s still just a research project, some experts believe wearable electronics will eventually become common—an idea Google recently put in the spotlight by confirming it’s working on glasses that can show the wearer maps, messages, and more (see “You Will Want Google Goggles”).


See on technologyreview.com

Notes

Experience is multisensory - why shouldn’t media include touch!? Disney Augmented Reality

Instead, Disney researchers employ a newly discovered physical phenomenon called reverse electrovibration to create the illusion of changing textures as the user’s fingers sweep across a surface. A weak electrical signal, which can be applied imperceptibly anywhere on the user’s body, creates an oscillating electrical field around the user’s fingers that is responsible for the tactile feedback.

The technology, called REVEL, could be used to create “please touch” museum displays, add haptic feedback to games, apply texture to projected images on surfaces of any size and shape, provide customized directions on walls for people with visual disabilities and enhance other applications of augmented reality.

"Augmented reality to date has focused primarily on visual and auditory feedback, but less on the sense of touch," said Olivier Bau, a postdoc at Disney Research, Pittsburgh. "Sight and sound are important, but we believe the addition of touch can create a really unique and magical experience."


See on pddnet.com

1 Notes

Video Games and Storytelling

Daniel Flloyd lecture from ‘08 highlights challenges of quality narrative content vs action. 


See on youtube.com

Notes

You know Social Media is mainstream when it becomes industry specific (i.e. Architects)


Healthcare Design Magazine: Architecture and Interior Design Trends for Healthcare Facilities,Healthcare facility and hospital design news and information for architects, designers and administrators.

See on healthcaredesignmagazine.com

Notes

Hot for E-Teacher: 4 reasons your brain loves to learn online

Via Scoop.it - Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies

Are we offloading our brains onto the web? Are programs better than teachers at knowing what we know? Do virtual badges motivate more than grades?  What is it about cartoon foxes that …
Via thenextweb.com

Notes

Telepresence - California Takes Giant Stride Towards Proliferation of Telemedicine with Governor Signing New Act | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care

Via Scoop.it - Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies

A new chapter was added to the California’s healthcare history, when Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 415, the Telehealth Advancement Act of 2011.
Via scoop.it

Notes

Malibu Times > Archives > Malibu Life > Working to change human trafficking

Via Scoop.it - Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies

Working to change human trafficking: Malibu filmmaker launches entertainment-based campaign to stop 21st-century slavery.   Transmedia storytelling provides and opportunity for emotional engagement through participation that creates stakeholders for social change.
Via malibutimes.com